Unreal Engine 4.13 Released

October 5, 2016 in Unreal Engine by Adrian Marius

unreal-logo-smallThis release brings hundreds of updates for Unreal Engine 4, including 145 improvements submitted by the community of Unreal Engine developers on GitHub

https://www.unrealengine.com/blog/unreal-engine-4-13-released

 

Unreal Engine 4.13 Released!

 

 

 

 

 

by admin

Blender 2.78 is released

October 1, 2016 in News by admin

blender-logoThe Blender Foundation and online developer community are proud to present Blender 2.78, released September 30th 2016! This release aims to be a very stable one, so that developers can focus better on Blender 2.8 work. Here are some of the highlights:

  • Spherical Stereo images rendering support for VR
  • Grease Pencil is now a full 2D drawing & animation tool!
  • Viewport Rendering improvements
  • New Freehand curves drawing over surfaces!
  • Bendy Bones, powerful new options for B-Bones
  • Alembic support: import/export basic operators
  • Cloth Physics: new Dynamic Base Mesh and Simulation Speed option
  • New Add-ons, individual preferences, Python APIs changes, and a lot of new & updated add-ons!
  • Many more features, improvements and the usual huge bug-fixes list.

For the original post and download, go here.

by admin

STMicroelectronics Attracts Linux Users to Free Embedded Development on STM32 Microcontrollers

February 11, 2016 in ARM, Hardware, Linux, Microcontroller, News, Programming, STM32 by admin

armvia st.com press release:

STMicroelectronics, a global semiconductor leader serving customers across the spectrum of electronics applications, has extended opportunities to design free of charge with its popular STM32 microcontrollers for Linux system users including professional engineers, academics, and hobbyists.

Most Linux distributions are free, and open-source application software makes the Linux world attractive to technology enthusiasts. Until now, however, most development tools for embedded computing have been available only for Windows® PCs.

The STM32CubeMX configurator and initialization tool and the System Workbench® for STM32, an Integrated Development Environment (IDE) created by Ac6 Tools, supported by the openSTM32.org community, and available at www.st.com/sw4stm32, are now both available to run on Linux OS.

ST’s latest move means Linux users can now start their own embedded projects on STM32 devices, free of charge, without leaving their favorite desktop environment.

“The Linux community is known to attract creative free-thinkers who are adept at sharing ideas and solving challenges efficiently,” said Laurent Desseignes, Microcontroller Ecosystem Marketing Manager, Microcontroller Division, STMicroelectronics. “We are now making it ultra-easy for them to apply their skills to create imaginative new products, leveraging the features and performance of our STM32 family.”

ST’s commitment means users can now benefit from free software for configuring microcontrollers and developing and debugging code, together with manufacturer-supported low-cost evaluation boards, allowing greater focus on product development. Tools installation is very easy and fast, which contrasts with established practice in the Linux world, where users often have to create or adapt their own tools with minimal support.

“Since the launch of the System Workbench for STM32 in early 2015, its popularity has grown both on Windows and Linux platforms,” said Bernard Dautrevaux, Ac6 Tools Chief Technical Officer. “ST’s new tools for Linux both validate and complement our work and the openSTM32 initiative, and we plan to further support ST with major upgrades to System Workbench for STM32 in the future, including the support of OS/X as a development host.”

For the original article and more details, follow this link.

Android 6.0 Marshmallow coming to devices soon

September 30, 2015 in Android, News by Adrian Marius

android-logoStarting next week, Android 6.0 Marshmallow will begin rolling out to supported Nexus devices around the world, including Nexus 5, Nexus 6, Nexus 7 (2013), Nexus 9, Nexus Player, and Android One. At the same time, we’ll be pushing the Android 6.0 source to the Android Open Source Project (AOSP), which marks the official beginning of public availability.

Today Google also introduced two great new Nexus devices that will be among the first to run the Android 6.0 Marshmallow platform. These devices let your apps use the latest platform features and take advantage of the latest hardware optimizations from our partners. Let’s take a look at how to make sure your apps look great on these new devices.

Introducing Nexus 5X and Nexus 6P

Nexus 5X

Nexus 6P

Read More on Android Developers blog

by admin

Native Android style in Qt 5.4

December 6, 2014 in C++, News, Programming, Qt by admin

qtvia blog.qt.digia.com:

As you might have heard, the upcoming Qt 5.4 release delivers a new Android style. This blog post explains what it means in practice for different types of Qt applications.

Qt Widgets

Earlier it has been possible to get native looks for Qt Widgets applications on Android with the help of Ministro, a system wide Qt libraries installer/provider for Android. In Qt 5.4, selected parts of Ministro source code have been incorporated into the Android platform plugin of Qt. This makes it possible for Qt applications to look native without Ministro, even though applications wishing to use services provided by Ministro will continue to do so. In other words, Qt Widgets applications will look native regardless of the deployment method; system wide or bundled Qt libraries. Read the rest of this entry →

by admin

Skype: Feature evolution and support for the Skype Desktop API

November 8, 2013 in News by admin

Skype_LogoYou might have noticed that skype was telling people that any third-party applications including call recorders, hardware add-ons, and non-Skype chat clients, will stop working starting this December.  This could change however, as the company announced that call recorders and hardware add-ons will continue to work for the indefinite future.

Quoting from skype blog:

As Mark Gillett described in his Technology Changes to Improve the Skype Experience blog post – the team has been hard at work updating our infrastructure and evolving our experiences across all our supported platforms.  The investments we’re making in Skype – to a highly mobile, cloud connected world – come with some key changes to our application and service architecture, and by extension – our support for the Desktop API used by 3rd party developers to extend Skype functionality.  Previously we shared that we would retire the Desktop API later this year. However, I’m happy to share that we will be extending support for two of the most widely used features – call recording and compatibility with hardware devices – until we determine alternative options or retire the current solution. Although chat via third party applications, will cease to work as previously communicated.

For more information and the original article, please follow this link.

 
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