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Live debugging ESP8266 with open-source tools

December 28, 2016 in C, C++, DIY, ESP8266, Microcontroller, Tips & Tricks by admin

The ESP8266 is a low-cost Wi-Fi chip with full TCP/IP stack and MCU (Micro Controller Unit) capability produced by Shanghai-based Chinese manufacturer, Espressif Systems.

Since 2014, when first came in the attention of the western makers, the documentation became quite available, together with couple of SDKs and firmwares for various programming langauges like Lua, together with the low price, made reasonable easy to develop applications hosted on this tiny chip. Some of this little chip’s features:

  • 32-bit RISC CPU: Tensilica Xtensa LX106 running at 80 MHz (can be overclocked)
  • 64 KiB of instruction RAM, 96 KiB of data RAM
  • External QSPI flash – 512 KiB to 4 MiB (up to 16 MiB is supported)
  • IEEE 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi
  • Integrated TR switch, balun, LNA, power amplifier and matching network
  • WEP or WPA/WPA2 authentication, or open networks
  • 16 GPIO pins
  • SPI, I²C,
  • I²S interfaces with DMA (sharing pins with GPIO)
  • UART on dedicated pins, plus a transmit-only UART can be enabled on GPIO2
  • 1 10-bit ADC

Although developing software to be hosted on it isn’t such a big challenge like it used to be due to the plenty of information available on the internet, debugging the code running on the MCU is a different story. Luckily, at the Attachix blog there is a series of articles about writing software for this MCU, and in the 4th article the owner was nice enough to describe how to set up step-by-step debugging of the code either by command line or even from Eclipse IDE. Please follow this link for the entire article.

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CppCon 2015: Scott Wardle “Memory and C++ debugging at Electronic Arts”

October 10, 2015 in C, C++, Programming, Programming Languages, Tips & Tricks by admin

c++Scott Wardle a senior software engineer Electronic Arts will talk about the current memory and C++ debugging setup and tools used in games.

PS4 and Xbox One have virtual memory and 64 bit address spaces, GPU and CPU are getting closer in the ability to work virtual memory. So our tools are getting better and better and closer to PCs. Most of a games memory goes towards art and level data like bitmap textures and polygon meshes. So artist and designer need to understand how much their data takes up. Giving them call stacks of memory allocations does not help. They want to know how big is a group of building is. Why is this group of building bigger than this one? Maybe this one has some animation data or one of the textures is too big. But there are 10,000s of objects built by 100s of people all around the world.

 
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