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CppCon 2015: Timur Doumler “C++ in the Audio Industry”

October 11, 2015 in C++, Programming, Programming Languages, Tips & Tricks by admin

c++Sound is an essential medium for human-computer interaction and vital for applications such as games and music production software. In the audio industry, C++ is the dominating programming language. This talk provides an insight into the patterns and tools that C++ developers in the audio industry rely on. There are interesting lessons to be learned from this domain that can be useful to every C++ developer.

Handling audio in real time presents interesting technical challenges. Techniques also used in other C++ domains have to be combined: real-time multithreading, lock-free programming, efficient DSP, SIMD, and low-latency hardware communication. C++ is the language of choice to tie all these requirements together. Clever leveraging of advanced C++ techniques, template metaprogramming, and the new C++11/14 standard makes these tasks more exciting than ever.

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CppCon 2015: Fedor Pikus “Live Lock-Free or Deadlock (Practical Lock-free Programming)”

October 11, 2015 in C++, Programming, Programming Languages by admin

c++Part I: Introduction to lock-free programming. We will cover the fundamentals of lock-free vs lock-based programming, explore the reasons to write lock-free programs as well as the reasons not to. We will learn, or be reminded, of the basic tools of lock-free programming and consider few simple examples. To make sure you stay on for part II, we will try something beyond the simple examples, for example, a lock-free list, just to see how insanely complex the problems can get. Part II: having been burned on the complexities of generic lock-free algorithms in part I, we take a more practical approach: assuming we are not all writing STL, what limitations can we really live with? Turns out that there are some inherent limitations imposed by the nature of the concurrent problem: is here really such a thing as “concurrent queue” (yes, sort of) and we can take advantages of these limitations (what an idea, concurrency actually makes something easier!) Then there are practical limitations that most application programmers can accept: is there really such a thing as a “lock-free queue” (may be, and you don’t need it). We will explore practical examples of (mostly) lock-free data structures, with actual implementations and performance measurements. Even if the specific limitations and simplifying assumptions used in this talk do not apply to your problem, the main idea to take away is how to find such assumptions and take advantage of them, because, chances are, you can use lock-free techniques and write code that works for you and is much simpler than what you learned before.

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CppCon 2015: Bjarne Stroustrup “Writing Good C++14”

October 11, 2015 in C++, Programming, Programming Languages, Tips & Tricks, Tutorial by admin

c++

How do we use C++14 to make our code better, rather than just different? How do we do so on a grand scale, rather than just for exceptional programmers? We need guidelines to help us progress from older styles, such as “C with Classes”, C, “pure OO”, etc. We need articulated rules to save us from each having to discover them for ourselves. Ideally, they should be machine-checkable, yet adjustable to serve specific needs.

In this talk, I describe a style of guidelines that can be deployed to help most C++ programmers. There could not be a single complete set of rules for everybody, but we are developing a set of rules for most C++ use. This core can be augmented with rules for specific application domains such as embedded systems and systems with stringent security requirements. The rules are prescriptive rather than merely sets of prohibitions, and about much more than code layout. I describe what the rules currently cover (e.g., interfaces, functions, resource management, and pointers). I describe tools and a few simple classes that can be used to support the guidelines.

 

 
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