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CppCon 2015: Timur Doumler “C++ in the Audio Industry”

October 11, 2015 in C++, Programming, Programming Languages, Tips & Tricks by admin

c++Sound is an essential medium for human-computer interaction and vital for applications such as games and music production software. In the audio industry, C++ is the dominating programming language. This talk provides an insight into the patterns and tools that C++ developers in the audio industry rely on. There are interesting lessons to be learned from this domain that can be useful to every C++ developer.

Handling audio in real time presents interesting technical challenges. Techniques also used in other C++ domains have to be combined: real-time multithreading, lock-free programming, efficient DSP, SIMD, and low-latency hardware communication. C++ is the language of choice to tie all these requirements together. Clever leveraging of advanced C++ techniques, template metaprogramming, and the new C++11/14 standard makes these tasks more exciting than ever.

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Self-Registering Objects in C++

September 29, 2015 in C++, Code Snippets, Programming, Source Code, Tips & Tricks, Tutorial by admin

c++A rather old (but nice) article by  about self-registering c++ objects. quote from www.drdobbs.com:

An interesting design limitation with C++ is that all the places in the code that create objects have to hardcode the types of objects that can be created because all the usual methods of creating an object in C++, such as new(classname), require you to specify a concrete type for the class name. This design breaks encapsulation. The situation is understood well by many beginning C++ designers, who try to find a virtual constructor that will create classes without knowing the exact type. These beginners quickly find out that C++ doesn’t have such a thing.

Since the functionality isn’t built into C++, I will add it by creating a class that can create other classes based on some criteria instead of a concrete type. Classes designed to create other classes are frequently called “factories.” I’ll call the class described in this article the “specialty store,” because it only works with objects that are closely related and it leaves the actual work of creation to other classes.

At compile time, the specialty store has no knowledge of the concrete classes it will be working with, but those concrete classes know about the specialty store. There are two remarkable things about this arrangement: A specialty store doesn’t contain a single new statement; and the specialty store’s implementation doesn’t include the header files for any of the classes that it will create at run time. (Instead, when the specialty store is asked for a new object, it queries the classes it knows how to create, asking each if it is appropriate for the current situation — if so, then that class is asked to create an instance of itself.)

For the entire article and the source code, follow this link.

CppCon 2015: Bjarne Stroustrup “Writing Good C++14”

September 23, 2015 in C++, Programming by Adrian Marius

c++How do we use C++14 to make our code better, rather than just different? How do we do so on a grand scale, rather than just for exceptional programmers? We need guidelines to help us progress from older styles, such as “C with Classes”, C, “pure OO”, etc. We need articulated rules to save us from each having to discover them for ourselves. Ideally, they should be machine-checkable, yet adjustable to serve specific needs.

In this talk, I describe a style of guidelines that can be deployed to help most C++ programmers. There could not be a single complete set of rules for everybody, but we are developing a set of rules for most C++ use. This core can be augmented with rules for specific application domains such as embedded systems and systems with stringent security requirements. The rules are prescriptive rather than merely sets of prohibitions, and about much more than code layout. I describe what the rules currently cover (e.g., interfaces, functions, resource management, and pointers). I describe tools and a few simple classes that can be used to support the guidelines.

The core guidelines and a guideline support library reference implementation will be open source projects freely available on all major platforms (initially, GCC, Clang, and Microsoft).

Bjarne Stroustrup announces C++ Core Guidelines

September 22, 2015 in C++ by Adrian Marius

c++This morning in his opening keynote at CppCon, Bjarne Stroustrup announced the C++ Core Guidelines (github.com/isocpp/CppCoreGuidelines), the start of a new open source project on GitHub to build modern authoritative guidelines for writing C++ code. The guidelines are designed to be modern, machine-enforceable wherever possible, and open to contributions and forking so that organizations can easily incorporate them into their own corporate coding guidelines.

 
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