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Low-level plugins in Unity WebGL

January 20, 2017 in C++, Game Engines, OpenCL, Tips & Tricks, Tutorial, Unity by admin

Last year the guys at Unity launched on their blog a series of technical articles on WebGL. They are now back with a new article, showing how to reuse existing C / C++ such as graphic effect written in OpenGL ES code in a webpage, using Unity WebGL.

For the article, follow this link.

Modern C++ Features – nullptr

December 17, 2015 in C++, Tips & Tricks by Adrian Marius

c++Probably everybody who has written C++03 code had the pleasure of using NULL and stumbling over one pitfall or another. C++11 brought the solution to those issues with nullptr.

Modern C++ Features – nullptr

Create a Game in Unity 5 : Top Down Shooter

December 15, 2015 in C++, CSharp, Unity by Adrian Marius

unityLogoIn this series we will be creating a fun top-down shooter style game using C# in the Unity engine.

The series is quite fast paced, and aimed at an audience that is already comfortable with the basics of Unity and C# programming. I hope you enjoy.

Follow me on twitter @SebastianLague
Support my videos on Patreon: http://bit.ly/sebPatreon

 

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Self-Registering Objects in C++

September 29, 2015 in C++, Code Snippets, Programming, Source Code, Tips & Tricks, Tutorial by admin

c++A rather old (but nice) article by  about self-registering c++ objects. quote from www.drdobbs.com:

An interesting design limitation with C++ is that all the places in the code that create objects have to hardcode the types of objects that can be created because all the usual methods of creating an object in C++, such as new(classname), require you to specify a concrete type for the class name. This design breaks encapsulation. The situation is understood well by many beginning C++ designers, who try to find a virtual constructor that will create classes without knowing the exact type. These beginners quickly find out that C++ doesn’t have such a thing.

Since the functionality isn’t built into C++, I will add it by creating a class that can create other classes based on some criteria instead of a concrete type. Classes designed to create other classes are frequently called “factories.” I’ll call the class described in this article the “specialty store,” because it only works with objects that are closely related and it leaves the actual work of creation to other classes.

At compile time, the specialty store has no knowledge of the concrete classes it will be working with, but those concrete classes know about the specialty store. There are two remarkable things about this arrangement: A specialty store doesn’t contain a single new statement; and the specialty store’s implementation doesn’t include the header files for any of the classes that it will create at run time. (Instead, when the specialty store is asked for a new object, it queries the classes it knows how to create, asking each if it is appropriate for the current situation — if so, then that class is asked to create an instance of itself.)

For the entire article and the source code, follow this link.

CppCon 2015: Bjarne Stroustrup “Writing Good C++14”

September 23, 2015 in C++, Programming by Adrian Marius

c++How do we use C++14 to make our code better, rather than just different? How do we do so on a grand scale, rather than just for exceptional programmers? We need guidelines to help us progress from older styles, such as “C with Classes”, C, “pure OO”, etc. We need articulated rules to save us from each having to discover them for ourselves. Ideally, they should be machine-checkable, yet adjustable to serve specific needs.

In this talk, I describe a style of guidelines that can be deployed to help most C++ programmers. There could not be a single complete set of rules for everybody, but we are developing a set of rules for most C++ use. This core can be augmented with rules for specific application domains such as embedded systems and systems with stringent security requirements. The rules are prescriptive rather than merely sets of prohibitions, and about much more than code layout. I describe what the rules currently cover (e.g., interfaces, functions, resource management, and pointers). I describe tools and a few simple classes that can be used to support the guidelines.

The core guidelines and a guideline support library reference implementation will be open source projects freely available on all major platforms (initially, GCC, Clang, and Microsoft).

Bjarne Stroustrup announces C++ Core Guidelines

September 22, 2015 in C++ by Adrian Marius

c++This morning in his opening keynote at CppCon, Bjarne Stroustrup announced the C++ Core Guidelines (github.com/isocpp/CppCoreGuidelines), the start of a new open source project on GitHub to build modern authoritative guidelines for writing C++ code. The guidelines are designed to be modern, machine-enforceable wherever possible, and open to contributions and forking so that organizations can easily incorporate them into their own corporate coding guidelines.

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Creating a Match 3 Game, Part 1,2 and 3

September 18, 2015 in C++, Code Snippets, Game Engines, Programming, Tips & Tricks, Tutorial, Unity by admin

unreal-logo-smallThe part 1,2 and 3 of creating a Match 3 game:

Lauren Ridge and Richard Hinckley show you how to build a Match 3 game using C++ in combination with Blueprints. In this first part of the series, you’ll get an overview of the game – including how to design your project utilizing both C++ and Blueprints – as well as starting to implement some of the base classes.

Part 2 continues with Lauren Ridge and Ian Shadden showing you how to use the coded move type and tile type to do visual and audio effects in blueprints, and the combos accelerating tiles.

In the 3rd part, Lauren Ridge and Richard Hinckley show you how to add swipe control to the Match 3 game using both the mouse and touch input. This is a must see for any mobile game developers out there!
Read the rest of this entry →

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Accessing C++11 Features of the Android NDK

January 13, 2015 in Android, C++, Programming, Tips & Tricks, Tutorial by admin

android-logoSource here

Once you start working with some of the handy new C++11 features, it is a bit difficult to stop using them simply because you want to work on an Android project. Fortunately, the Android NDK supports C++11 features, although they are not enabled by default. The default Android NDK configuration provides only a minimal C++ runtime support library and doesn’t include the necessary flags to activate available C++11 features. In this article, I explain how set up a project to use C++11 features, relying on Eclipse and the latest available Android NDK, version r9d.

Consider a very common scenario in which you want to create a new Android app by reusing existing C++ code. In these cases, a typical solution is to develop the UI in Java and use the Java Native Interface (JNI) to make calls to the C++ code from Java (and the other way around if necessary). If your existing C++ code has been written taking advantage of C++11 features, you certainly would not want to create a new version removing all these C++11 features just to make it fit with the default Android NDK configuration. Fortunately, you can activate the NDK’s C++11 features to allow you to work with modern C++ amenities, and you can go on using the auto keyword, lambda expressions, and other useful C++11 features.

I’ll assume that you have basic experience working with Eclipse, Android Development Tools (ADT), and the Android NDK; hence, I won’t provide specific instructions for the basic setup of these tools. You will need ADT and NDK installed on your system in order to test the examples. Because ADT and NDK have important changes in each new release, it’s important to note that I am using ADT Build v22.6.2-1085508 and NDK Revision 9d. This way, I can focus on the necessary configurations and tweaks related to C++11 and the related features. I’ll use a simple example Android app that employs a few C++11 features combined with some use of the Standard Templates Library (STL). Finally, I’ll explain additional options and configurations that you might need to consider.”

For the entire article, follow this link.

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Native / desktop applications with SmartClient (or other JavaScript framework)

January 11, 2015 in C++, Programming, Qt, Source Code by admin

qtHow to develop & deploy native / desktop applications using Qt & javascript framework, without using a web server.

For more information, follow this link.

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Translations in C++ using tables with zero-based enums

January 11, 2015 in C++, Programming, Tips & Tricks by admin

c++From http://www.g-truc.net/post-0704.html – a nice article about translations in C++ using tables with zero-based enums:

Few months ago, I got annoy that we had some code that translate API independent enumerations to OpenGL enumerations, back and forth, with basically no consideration at what happens when we add a new enumeration value in the API independent enumerations and no consideration of how this translation would perform within the rendering loop, where performance is critical and it’s typically going to be called. Considering the high number of translations per frame, probably it starts to matter.

For the entire article and more information, follow this link.

 
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