Huawei, Google supercharge Android with new Raspberry Pi-like board

May 5, 2017 in Android, Hardware by Adrian Marius

Prepare to run Android at blazing fast speeds on a new Raspberry Pi-like computer developed by Huawei.

Huawei’s HiKey 960 computer board is priced at US$239 but has some of the latest CPU and GPU technologies. Google, ARM, Huawei, Archermind, and LeMaker all played roles in developing the board.

The HiKey 960 is meant to be a go-to PC for Android or a tool to develop software and drivers for the OS. The board development was backed by Linaro, an organization that develops software packages for the Android OS and  ARM architecture.

 

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Using the LPC11xx I2C driver

February 17, 2016 in ARM, C, Code Snippets, Hardware, Microcontroller, Programming, Source Code, Tips & Tricks, Tutorial by admin

arm_cortex_logoShort article on using the I2C driver with LPC11xx for the people who don’t want over the way too complicated sample included with the library and just look for a quick way to get I2C up and running as soon as possible. For accessing the article, follow this link.

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STMicroelectronics Attracts Linux Users to Free Embedded Development on STM32 Microcontrollers

February 11, 2016 in ARM, Hardware, Linux, Microcontroller, News, Programming, STM32 by admin

armvia st.com press release:

STMicroelectronics, a global semiconductor leader serving customers across the spectrum of electronics applications, has extended opportunities to design free of charge with its popular STM32 microcontrollers for Linux system users including professional engineers, academics, and hobbyists.

Most Linux distributions are free, and open-source application software makes the Linux world attractive to technology enthusiasts. Until now, however, most development tools for embedded computing have been available only for Windows® PCs.

The STM32CubeMX configurator and initialization tool and the System Workbench® for STM32, an Integrated Development Environment (IDE) created by Ac6 Tools, supported by the openSTM32.org community, and available at www.st.com/sw4stm32, are now both available to run on Linux OS.

ST’s latest move means Linux users can now start their own embedded projects on STM32 devices, free of charge, without leaving their favorite desktop environment.

“The Linux community is known to attract creative free-thinkers who are adept at sharing ideas and solving challenges efficiently,” said Laurent Desseignes, Microcontroller Ecosystem Marketing Manager, Microcontroller Division, STMicroelectronics. “We are now making it ultra-easy for them to apply their skills to create imaginative new products, leveraging the features and performance of our STM32 family.”

ST’s commitment means users can now benefit from free software for configuring microcontrollers and developing and debugging code, together with manufacturer-supported low-cost evaluation boards, allowing greater focus on product development. Tools installation is very easy and fast, which contrasts with established practice in the Linux world, where users often have to create or adapt their own tools with minimal support.

“Since the launch of the System Workbench for STM32 in early 2015, its popularity has grown both on Windows and Linux platforms,” said Bernard Dautrevaux, Ac6 Tools Chief Technical Officer. “ST’s new tools for Linux both validate and complement our work and the openSTM32 initiative, and we plan to further support ST with major upgrades to System Workbench for STM32 in the future, including the support of OS/X as a development host.”

For the original article and more details, follow this link.

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Atmel START software management platform

October 29, 2015 in ARM, Hardware, Microcontroller, Tips & Tricks by admin

arm_cortex_logoAtmel START is a web-based tool that helps developers easily integrate basic software building blocks and focus on their applications rather than configuration and integration of the basic software building blocks. With Atmel START software developers can:

  • graphically select software components
  • configure them for Atmel evaluation boards or custom boards.
  • build software platforms consisting of

low-level drivers,
advanced middleware,
Real Time Operating Systems (RTOS),
high-level communication stacks and more.

  • once configured, developers can download the configured software package into their own IDE and build their application.

Atmel START supports graphical configuring of pin-muxes, along with clock trees, and the configured software package can be downloaded for a variety of supported development environments. Atmel START is entirely web-based so no installation is required.

“Atmel START tool brings new possibilities for users of IAR Embedded Workbench,” said Mats Ullström, COO, IAR Systems. “Our advanced development tools complement the high-quality software that Atmel START delivers very well, and being able to rapidly configure example projects and deploy them on not only the hardware the user wants, but also for the tools the user is most comfortable with, is key to being able to get to market quickly.”

“The Atmel START platform makes it easy for developers to get projects off the ground quickly and obtain the most benefit from working with ARM Keil® MDK tools,” said Reinhard Keil, Director of Microcontroller Tools, ARM. “By using CMSIS, Atmel has once again proven the value of creating a platform built on a standards-based approach. Atmel START creates a robust and portable software management system that makes it easy for developers to deploy applications in any environment.”

Click this link to explore Atmel START platform.

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ARM Guide for Unity developers version 3

September 28, 2015 in Game Engines, OpenGL, Programming, Tips & Tricks, Tutorial, Unity by admin

unityLogovia malideveloper.arm.com:

The version 3.0 adds the following content:

  • Using Enlighten in custom shaders
  • Combining reflections
  • Using Early-z
  • Dirty lens effect
  • Light shafts
  • Fog effects
  • Bloom
  • Icy wall effect
  • Procedural skybox
  • Fireflies
  • Tangent space to world space conversion tool

Follow this link to download the guide.

 

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Cortex-M3 supervisor call (SVC) using GCC

December 12, 2013 in Code Snippets, Microcontroller, Source Code, Tips & Tricks, Tutorial by admin

cortex-m3Origina article here.

The Cortex-M3 has a new assembler instruction SVC to call the supervisor (usually the operating system). The ARM7TDMI used to call this interrupt SWI, but since this interrupt works differently on Cortex-M3, ARM renamed the instruction to make sure people recognize the difference and implement those calls correctly. The machine opcode however is still the same (bits 0-23 are user defined, bits 24-27 are ones).

On the Cortex-M3, other interrupts can interrupt the processor during state saving of the SVC interrupt (late arrival interrupt handling). Those late arriving interrupts most certainly leave the registers corrupted after execution. Therefor we cannot read the parameters form registers r0 to r4 directly as we could on the ARM7TDMI using SWI interrupts. Fortunately, the Cortex-M3 saves all registers used in standard C procedure call specification (ABI) on the stack. So the SVC handler can get the parameters directly from the stack. Read the rest of this entry →

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Building GCC From Scratch for ARM development

October 29, 2013 in AVR, Hardware, Microcontroller, Tips & Tricks, Tutorial by admin

gnu-meditate A nice tutorial about how to build the gcc toolchain for bare-bone arm development.

For more information, follow this link.

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Freescale announces world’s smallest ARM chip

March 7, 2013 in News by admin

Freescale introduces the Kinetis KL02 chip-scale package (CSP), the world’s smallest ARM Powered® MCU. Available in the ultra-small 1.9 mm x 2.0 mm wafer level chip-scale package, the KL02 CSP (MKL02Z32CAF4R) drastically reduces board space while retaining rich MCU feature integration. The KL02 CSP consumes 25 percent less PCB area, yet delivers 60 percent more GPIO than the nearest competing MCU.

The Kinetis KL0 family is the entry point into the low-power Kinetis L series MCUs based on the ARM® Cortex™-M0+ processor, delivering 32-bit performance with class-leading code density, integrated flash memory, precision analog, connectivity and timers.

Features:

  • Next-generation 32-bit ARM Cortex-M0+ core: 2x more CoreMark/mA than the closest 8/16-bit architecture
  • Single-cycle fast I/O access port facilitates bit banging and software protocol emulation, keeping an 8-bit “look and feel”
  • Multiple flexible low-power modes, including new compute clocking option which reduces dynamic power by placing peripherals in an asynchronous stop mode
  • LPSCI, SPI, I2C, ADC, DAC, LP timer and DMA support low-power mode operation without waking up the core
  • Up to 32 KB flash with 64 byte flash cache, up to 4 KB RAM
  • Security circuitry to prevent unauthorized access to RAM and flash contents
  • ARM Cortex-M0+ core, 48 MHz core frequency over full voltage and temperature range (-40ºC to +105ºC)
  • Bit manipulation engine for improved bit handling of peripheral modules
  • Thumb instruction set combines high code density with 32-bit performance
  • Up to 4-ch. DMA for peripheral and memory servicing with reduced CPU loading and faster system throughput
  • Independent-clocked COP guards against clock skew or code runaway for fail-safe applications
  • 12-bit ADC with configurable resolution, sample time and conversion speed/power
  • Integrated temperature sensor
  • High-speed comparator with internal 6-bit DAC
  • 12-bit DAC with DMA support
  • One 6-ch. and one 2-ch. 16-bit low-power timer PWM modules with DMA support
  • 2-ch., 32-bit periodic interrupt timer provides time base for RTOS task schedule or trigger source for ADC conversion
  • Low-power timer allows operation in all power modes except for VLLS0
  • Real-time clock with calendar
  • Capacitive touch sense interface supports up to 16 external electrodes and DMA data transfer
  • GPIO with pin interrupt support, DMA request capability and other pin control options
  • I2C with DMA support, up to 100 kbps and compatible with SMBus V2 features
  • LPUART and SPI with DMA support

Follow this link for more information, documentation, software and tools.

 
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