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Using the LPC11xx I2C driver

February 17, 2016 in ARM, C, Code Snippets, Hardware, Microcontroller, Programming, Source Code, Tips & Tricks, Tutorial by admin

arm_cortex_logoShort article on using the I2C driver with LPC11xx for the people who don’t want over the way too complicated sample included with the library and just look for a quick way to get I2C up and running as soon as possible. For accessing the article, follow this link.

Learning how to make 2D games in Unity

January 5, 2016 in Programming, Tips & Tricks, Tutorial, Unity by Adrian Marius

Learning how to make 2D games in Unity? Check out our handy page for all things Unity and 2D!

Unreal Match 3 mobile game source published

December 21, 2015 in Game Engines, Source Code, Tips & Tricks, Tutorial, Unreal Engine by Adrian Marius

2015-12-21 18-33-52 Unreal Match 3 - Android Apps on Google Play

Unreal Match 3 is a fully-featured match three-style game. Epic believes that this project can become “learning resource to help people learn how to make great games and apps”

Unreal Match 3 shows how you can use the popular engine to build optimized mobile products for a wide range of mobile devices. It also serves as a great example of how you can implement such features as achievements, analytics and in-app purchases in your game.

The project was developed from the good up by Epic’s learning resources team in just a few months. You can download the game, or you can actually download all the assets and source code, to study the production and make something of your own.

 

http://80.lv/articles/unreal-match-3-making-mobile-games-with-ue4/

 

Videos for this Learning Series

 

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Maze, building your own randomized place

December 9, 2015 in Tutorial, Unity by Adrian Marius

unityLogoIn this tutorial we’ll generate a maze with multiple distinct areas and navigate through it. You’ll learn to

  • fill a 2D rectangle with a maze-generating algorithm;
  • visualize the algorithm by using a coroutine;
  • place walls and doors;
  • use object inheritance;
  • use extension methods;
  • move through the maze;
  • combine first-person view and an overlay map;
  • determine visible rooms.

You’re assumed to know the basics of the Unity editor and scripting. If you’ve completed theClock and Fractal tutorials you’re good to go.

Enter a random maze of your own creation.

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Persistent graphic settings in UE4

December 1, 2015 in C++, Programming, Source Code, Tips & Tricks, Tutorial, Unreal Engine by admin

unreal-logo-smallA C++ article about persistent graphic settings in UE4:

In comparison to modern consoles there are hundreds and thousands of various PC hardware configurations. Different graphics cards, central processors, memory etc. in all sizes, shapes and colors allow for an endless number of various hardware setups. Some of those are more powerful than others, and not every PC can play the latest game with graphics settings at their maximum level. Typically on the PC platform one can control different aspects of tuning those graphics settings: from the resolution of the monitor, via anti-aliasing techniques, to texture and shadow quality levels. All these settings allow to adapt the game to the actual performance of the hardware in use.

Modern game engines allow to set such things out of the box, and UE4 is no exception. Epic calls this “scalability”, and on top of those things mentioned before in Unreal you can also set quite a few more game and graphics aspects, such as post processing quality, effects quality, material quality, and others.

Well, in UE4 you basically have two main parts to tweak in terms of graphics settings. On one hand that is the so-called video mode, which is basically nothing else than the game screen resolution, as well as whether or not to render the game in full screen mode or in a (borderless) window. On the other hand you have those quality settings mentioned above and listed in detail in the UE4 scalability documentation.

Now the question is how one can set and change those values and parameters from within the game. The obvious way is to do so via in-game console commands. A simple web search will reveal those commands to you, for example as listed in the UE4 answer hub. However, using those console commands seems to be a bit cumbersome, and from our understanding that is also not the way Epic recommends. For example, you need to explicitly call those commands every time you start the game, which for sure is not what we want. Instead we want the engine itself to automatically do all those things for us. Thus let’s have a look at handling those graphics settings the proper way, and in particular: permanently!

For reading the article, please follow this link.

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Loading Screens using Level Streaming in Unreal Engine 4

November 22, 2015 in Game Engines, Tips & Tricks, Tutorial, Unreal Engine by admin

unreal-logo-smallNice video introduction about loading screen system with menus using Level Streaming in Unreal Engine 4.

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Using The Gamepad API In Web Games

November 22, 2015 in Code Snippets, Tips & Tricks, Tutorial by admin

html5Source: here
The Gamepad API is a relatively new piece of technology that allows us to access the state of connected gamepads using JavaScript, which is great news for HTML5 game developers.

A lot of game genres, such as racing and platform fighting games, rely on a gamepad rather than a keyboard and mouse for the best experience. This means these games can now be played on the web with the same gamepads that are used for consoles.

This link provides a nice article about how to use the Gamepad API in games.

Introduction To Unity: Particle Systems

November 20, 2015 in Tutorial, Unity by Adrian Marius

unreal-logo-smallParticles effects are like salt; just a small amount can add extra “pizzazz” to whatever you’re cooking up. Modern games that don’t use particle effects in some manner feel can quite bland.

Particles also add authenticity to scenes. They can be the foundation of a roaring campfire, or the luminous effects of a wizard’s spells. They can also be used to create smoke, dust, explosions, and even rainbow puke! :]

In essence, particles are small, simple images or meshes that are emitted and then manipulated by a particle system during their lifetime.

Back in the old days, you needed to know the black arts of graphics programming to make even a wisp of smoke. Thankfully, Unity makes creating particle systems quite simple. Unity uses a powerful, modular built-in particle system named Shuriken, which is quite easy to learn but also lets you create complex effects – once you get to know it.

In this tutorial you’ll learn the following:

  • How to add a new particle system in Unity.
  • What the most commonly used particle system modules do and how to use them.

 

 

Make particle effects like these!

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CppCon 2015: Bjarne Stroustrup “Writing Good C++14”

October 11, 2015 in C++, Programming, Programming Languages, Tips & Tricks, Tutorial by admin

c++

How do we use C++14 to make our code better, rather than just different? How do we do so on a grand scale, rather than just for exceptional programmers? We need guidelines to help us progress from older styles, such as “C with Classes”, C, “pure OO”, etc. We need articulated rules to save us from each having to discover them for ourselves. Ideally, they should be machine-checkable, yet adjustable to serve specific needs.

In this talk, I describe a style of guidelines that can be deployed to help most C++ programmers. There could not be a single complete set of rules for everybody, but we are developing a set of rules for most C++ use. This core can be augmented with rules for specific application domains such as embedded systems and systems with stringent security requirements. The rules are prescriptive rather than merely sets of prohibitions, and about much more than code layout. I describe what the rules currently cover (e.g., interfaces, functions, resource management, and pointers). I describe tools and a few simple classes that can be used to support the guidelines.

 

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Unity 5 Tutorial Fight System Similar to Assassins Creed Part 1 & 2

October 5, 2015 in Game Engines, Tips & Tricks, Tutorial, Unreal Engine by admin

 

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