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Intel® RealSense™ SDK Plug-In for Unreal Engine* 4

January 14, 2016 in C++, Game Engines, News, Programming, Programming Languages, Unreal Engine by admin

unreal-logo-smallThe Intel RealSense SDK is natively implemented in C++, making it easy for developers to access its features from game code also written in C++. This plugin enhances the UE4 developer experience by exposing these same SDK features through Blueprints scripts.

At the time of this writing, the officially supported features of the plugin are the following:

  • Raw Color and Depth Camera Streaming
  • 3D Face and Object Scanning

Two other features are currently in-progress:

  • Head Tracking
  • Scene Scanning

Ultimately, our goal for this plugin is to support each of the Gold features of the Intel RealSense SDK that are applicable to gaming.

For more details and the entire article follow this link.

Unreal Editor 4.10.2 Hotfix Released

January 12, 2016 in C++, Unreal Engine by Adrian Marius

The 4.10.2 Hotfix is now live!

This Hotfix resolves a few important issues. Feel free to continue the discussion about this release on the 4.10 announcement thread.

Fixed in 4.10.2- CL#2818068

Fixed! UE-23845 Crash when using “Set Key Time” on an animation key in UMG
Fixed! UE-24685 Matinee movie recording is broken in 4.10
Fixed! UE-22573 A REINST error occurs in widgets that reference one another
Fixed! UE-24115 Cannot launch the editor in DebugGame Editor configuration from Xcode
Fixed! UE-24563 Editor should launch launcher silently

Important Note – ‘VisualStudio2015 Update 1’ is not compatible with the UE 4.10.2 release. Please do not update to VisualStudio2015 Update 1 while using UE 4.10.2

Modern C++ Features – nullptr

December 17, 2015 in C++, Tips & Tricks by Adrian Marius

c++Probably everybody who has written C++03 code had the pleasure of using NULL and stumbling over one pitfall or another. C++11 brought the solution to those issues with nullptr.

Modern C++ Features – nullptr

Getting Started with Unreal Engine from Visual Studio

December 16, 2015 in C++, Programming Languages, Unreal Engine by Adrian Marius

Visual Studio has partnered with some of the most popular game engines to bring you an easy acquisition experience for game development tools.  Today we are pleased to confirm that we now provide the ability to acquire and install the Unreal Engine directly from the IDE.

Create a Game in Unity 5 : Top Down Shooter

December 15, 2015 in C++, CSharp, Unity by Adrian Marius

unityLogoIn this series we will be creating a fun top-down shooter style game using C# in the Unity engine.

The series is quite fast paced, and aimed at an audience that is already comfortable with the basics of Unity and C# programming. I hope you enjoy.

Follow me on twitter @SebastianLague
Support my videos on Patreon: http://bit.ly/sebPatreon

 

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Persistent graphic settings in UE4

December 1, 2015 in C++, Programming, Source Code, Tips & Tricks, Tutorial, Unreal Engine by admin

unreal-logo-smallA C++ article about persistent graphic settings in UE4:

In comparison to modern consoles there are hundreds and thousands of various PC hardware configurations. Different graphics cards, central processors, memory etc. in all sizes, shapes and colors allow for an endless number of various hardware setups. Some of those are more powerful than others, and not every PC can play the latest game with graphics settings at their maximum level. Typically on the PC platform one can control different aspects of tuning those graphics settings: from the resolution of the monitor, via anti-aliasing techniques, to texture and shadow quality levels. All these settings allow to adapt the game to the actual performance of the hardware in use.

Modern game engines allow to set such things out of the box, and UE4 is no exception. Epic calls this “scalability”, and on top of those things mentioned before in Unreal you can also set quite a few more game and graphics aspects, such as post processing quality, effects quality, material quality, and others.

Well, in UE4 you basically have two main parts to tweak in terms of graphics settings. On one hand that is the so-called video mode, which is basically nothing else than the game screen resolution, as well as whether or not to render the game in full screen mode or in a (borderless) window. On the other hand you have those quality settings mentioned above and listed in detail in the UE4 scalability documentation.

Now the question is how one can set and change those values and parameters from within the game. The obvious way is to do so via in-game console commands. A simple web search will reveal those commands to you, for example as listed in the UE4 answer hub. However, using those console commands seems to be a bit cumbersome, and from our understanding that is also not the way Epic recommends. For example, you need to explicitly call those commands every time you start the game, which for sure is not what we want. Instead we want the engine itself to automatically do all those things for us. Thus let’s have a look at handling those graphics settings the proper way, and in particular: permanently!

For reading the article, please follow this link.

by admin

Cocos2D-x v3.9 released

November 16, 2015 in C++, Cocos2d-x, Game Engines, Programming Languages by admin

cocos2dx-logoThis release serves as a maintenance release, focusing on stability, bug fixes and completing API’s. Enhancements to 2D, 3D, Physics and a new JS and LUA scripting component! It is recommended to upgrade if your circumstances allow it.

Join to the conversation and provide feedback on the forums. If you wish to contribute, please head on over to their GitHub repo.

Source here

Bjarne Stroustrup on the 30th anniversary of Cfront (the first C++ compiler)

October 14, 2015 in C++ by Adrian Marius

Bjarne Stroustrup on the 30th anniversary of Cfront (the first C++ compiler)

http://cpp-lang.io/30-years-of-cpp-bjarne-stroustrup/

 

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CppCon 2015: Timur Doumler “C++ in the Audio Industry”

October 11, 2015 in C++, Programming, Programming Languages, Tips & Tricks by admin

c++Sound is an essential medium for human-computer interaction and vital for applications such as games and music production software. In the audio industry, C++ is the dominating programming language. This talk provides an insight into the patterns and tools that C++ developers in the audio industry rely on. There are interesting lessons to be learned from this domain that can be useful to every C++ developer.

Handling audio in real time presents interesting technical challenges. Techniques also used in other C++ domains have to be combined: real-time multithreading, lock-free programming, efficient DSP, SIMD, and low-latency hardware communication. C++ is the language of choice to tie all these requirements together. Clever leveraging of advanced C++ techniques, template metaprogramming, and the new C++11/14 standard makes these tasks more exciting than ever.

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CppCon 2015: Fedor Pikus “Live Lock-Free or Deadlock (Practical Lock-free Programming)”

October 11, 2015 in C++, Programming, Programming Languages by admin

c++Part I: Introduction to lock-free programming. We will cover the fundamentals of lock-free vs lock-based programming, explore the reasons to write lock-free programs as well as the reasons not to. We will learn, or be reminded, of the basic tools of lock-free programming and consider few simple examples. To make sure you stay on for part II, we will try something beyond the simple examples, for example, a lock-free list, just to see how insanely complex the problems can get. Part II: having been burned on the complexities of generic lock-free algorithms in part I, we take a more practical approach: assuming we are not all writing STL, what limitations can we really live with? Turns out that there are some inherent limitations imposed by the nature of the concurrent problem: is here really such a thing as “concurrent queue” (yes, sort of) and we can take advantages of these limitations (what an idea, concurrency actually makes something easier!) Then there are practical limitations that most application programmers can accept: is there really such a thing as a “lock-free queue” (may be, and you don’t need it). We will explore practical examples of (mostly) lock-free data structures, with actual implementations and performance measurements. Even if the specific limitations and simplifying assumptions used in this talk do not apply to your problem, the main idea to take away is how to find such assumptions and take advantage of them, because, chances are, you can use lock-free techniques and write code that works for you and is much simpler than what you learned before.

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