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Ebay HY-MiniSTM32V LCD initialization and Adafruit GFX Library port to STM32F103

October 27, 2017 in ARM, C, C++, Code Snippets, DIY, Hardware, Microcontroller, Programming, STM32, Tutorial by admin

A while ago I’ve bought a HY-MiniSTM32V board from Ebay. There are two boards – a main board with the STM32F103VCT6 microcontroller and a 240×320 pixel LCD board with resistive touch screen. The LCD itself is connected to the FSMC (Flexible Static Memory Controller) and can be mapped as a memory device.

The FSMC is an embedded external memory controller that allows the STM32F10xxx microcontroller to interface with a wide range of memories, including SRAM, NOR Flash, NAND Flash and LCD modules. The suitable connection to LCD is as a NOR Flash / SRAM device.

From AN2790 – TFT LCD interfacing with the high-density STM32F10xxx FSMC:

To control a NOR Flash/SRAM memory, the FSMC provides the following features:

  • Select the bank to be used to map the NOR Flash/SRAM memory: there are four independent banks that can be used to interface with NOR Flash/SRAM/PSRAM memories, and each bank is selected using a separate Chip Select pin.
  • Enable or disable the address/data multiplexing feature.
  • Select the memory type to be used: NOR Flash/SRAM/PSRAM.
  • Define the external memory databus width: 8/16 bits.
  • Enable or disable the burst access mode for NOR Flash synchronous memories.
  • Configure the use of the wait signal: enable/disable, polarity setting and timing configuration.
  • Enable or disable the extended mode: this mode is used to access the memory with different timing configurations for read and write operations.

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7 Ways to Get Better at C++ During this Summer

June 25, 2017 in C++ by Adrian Marius

Summer Is Coming.

With it comes the sea, the sun, the beach, or the mountain or perhaps your family house. But there is also a great thing that comes with summer: more time. Maybe you’re taking some time off, or maybe this is just because work is less intensive during this period. In all cases, summer is a limited period where time is less scarce than during the rest of the year.

You have two options: 1) Spend all of it chilling out. And it’s ok to have a good time. 2) Or, you could invest a part of it into levelling up your skills, in C++ in particular, and start next year with a boost (pun very much intended).

If you feel that option 1) is better for you just then shut down that phone or laptop and get some real rest! But if you’re up for option 2) then this post is made for you.

Better C++ summer

Here are 7 ideas that will let you leverage on your summertime to get a real push in C++. And after that I give you a couple of tips to help you actually achieve the goals that you choose.

How to Create a Custom Physics Engine

June 20, 2017 in C++, Tutorial by Adrian Marius

There are many reasons you might want to create a custom physics engine: first, learning and honing your skills in mathematics, physics and programming are great reasons to attempt such a project; second, a custom physics engine can tackle any sort of technical effect the creator has the skill to create. In this series, Randy Gaul provides a solid introduction on how to create a custom physics engine entirely from scratch.

 

 

 

Android Firebird JDBC Driver Jaybird 2.2.12 is updated for Android Studio

March 27, 2017 in Java, News, Programming by Adrian Marius

Android Firebird JDBC Driver Jaybird 2.2.12 is updated for Android Studio

Christian Mayer wrote on Android Jaybird discussion forum

Hi Toni,
i have updated the example in the download area.
Basically you have to go to File -> Project Structure and klick the green add sign in the upper left.
Then choose “Import .JAR/.AAR Package” and select the aar file.
After that in the group area select app and go to Dependencies.
Here klick the green add sign in the upper right a choose “Module Dependencies”
If that doesn’t work please use the provided example.

Ps: It’s compiled as Android-Library : AAR .
You can use it like this:
https://developer.android.com/studio/projects/android-library.html#AddDependency
or this:
http://docs.onemobilesdk.aol.com/android-ad-sdk/adding-aar-files.html

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Stingray Engine Code Walkthrough

January 27, 2017 in C, Game Engines, Stingray, Stingray, Tutorial by admin

 

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Qt Speech (Text to Speech) is here

January 25, 2017 in C++, News, Programming, Programming Languages, Qt by admin

via Qt blog:

“I’m happy that with Qt 5.8.0 we’ll have Qt Speech added as a new tech preview module. It took a while to get it in shape since the poor thing sometimes did not get the attention it deserved. We had trouble with some Android builds before that backend received proper care. Luckily there’s always the great Qt community to help out.

What’s in the package? Text to speech, that’s about it. The module is rather small, it abstracts away different platform backends to let you (or rather your apps) say smart things. In the screen shot you see that speech dispatcher on Linux does not care much about gender, that’s platform dependent and we do our best to give you access to the different voices and information about them.”

For more details, follow this link.

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Stingray Engine Code Walkthrough

January 25, 2017 in C, Game Engines, Programming, Stingray by admin

 

C++11 multithreading tutorial

January 23, 2017 in C++, Tutorial by Adrian Marius

The code for this tutorial is on GitHub: https://github.com/sol-prog/threads.

In  previous tutorials I’ve presented some of the newest C++11 additions to the language: regular expressions, raw strings and lambdas.

Perhaps one of the biggest change to the language is the addition of multithreading support. Before C++11, it was possible to target multicore computers using OS facilities (pthreads on Unix like systems) or libraries like OpenMP and MPI.

This tutorial is meant to get you started with C++11 threads and not to be an exhaustive reference of the standard.

 

 

The lost art of 3D rendering without shaders

January 22, 2017 in Programming Languages, Swift by Adrian Marius

Let’s say you wanted to create a sweet bouncing cube, like this:

A bouncing cube

You might use a 3D framework such as OpenGL or Metal. That involves writing one or more vertex shaders to transform your 3D objects, and one or more fragment shaders to draw these transformed objects on the screen.

The framework then takes these shaders and your 3D data, performs some magic, and paints everything in glorious 32-bit color.

But what exactly is that magic that OpenGL and Metal do behind the scenes?

http://machinethink.net/blog/3d-rendering-without-shaders/

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Stingray Engine Code Walkthrough

January 20, 2017 in C, Game Engines, Programming, Stingray, Stingray, Tutorial by admin

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