by admin

Low-level plugins in Unity WebGL

January 20, 2017 in C++, Game Engines, OpenCL, Tips & Tricks, Tutorial, Unity by admin

Last year the guys at Unity launched on their blog a series of technical articles on WebGL. They are now back with a new article, showing how to reuse existing C / C++ such as graphic effect written in OpenGL ES code in a webpage, using Unity WebGL.

For the article, follow this link.

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Live debugging ESP8266 with open-source tools

December 28, 2016 in C, C++, DIY, ESP8266, Microcontroller, Tips & Tricks by admin

The ESP8266 is a low-cost Wi-Fi chip with full TCP/IP stack and MCU (Micro Controller Unit) capability produced by Shanghai-based Chinese manufacturer, Espressif Systems.

Since 2014, when first came in the attention of the western makers, the documentation became quite available, together with couple of SDKs and firmwares for various programming langauges like Lua, together with the low price, made reasonable easy to develop applications hosted on this tiny chip. Some of this little chip’s features:

  • 32-bit RISC CPU: Tensilica Xtensa LX106 running at 80 MHz (can be overclocked)
  • 64 KiB of instruction RAM, 96 KiB of data RAM
  • External QSPI flash – 512 KiB to 4 MiB (up to 16 MiB is supported)
  • IEEE 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi
  • Integrated TR switch, balun, LNA, power amplifier and matching network
  • WEP or WPA/WPA2 authentication, or open networks
  • 16 GPIO pins
  • SPI, I²C,
  • I²S interfaces with DMA (sharing pins with GPIO)
  • UART on dedicated pins, plus a transmit-only UART can be enabled on GPIO2
  • 1 10-bit ADC

Although developing software to be hosted on it isn’t such a big challenge like it used to be due to the plenty of information available on the internet, debugging the code running on the MCU is a different story. Luckily, at the Attachix blog there is a series of articles about writing software for this MCU, and in the 4th article the owner was nice enough to describe how to set up step-by-step debugging of the code either by command line or even from Eclipse IDE. Please follow this link for the entire article.

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LibGDX game development with android studio – Creating Super Mario Bros

November 3, 2016 in Game Engines, Java, libGDX, Source Code, Tips & Tricks, Tutorial by admin

libgdx-logoA nice Youtube series of 32 videos by Brent Aureli about developing a Super Mario Bros game step by step using LibGDX and Android Studio. The videos include information about setting up libGDX with Android Studio, screens, viewports, aspect ratios, how to create a HUD, creating and rendering tilemaps, Box2D, spritesheeets and texture packer, animations, collisions, sound and music, moving & spawning items, and various other topics.

Read the rest of this entry →

Unreal Engine C++ Tutorial – Episode 1: Classes

October 5, 2016 in C++, Uncategorized, Unreal Engine by Adrian Marius

unreal-logo-smallRemaking the basics series for the newest version of the unreal engine, since some of the code is now outdated/deprecated.

 

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Cocos2d-x v3.13.1 and Cocos Creator 1.2.2 released

September 30, 2016 in Cocos2d-x, Cocos2d-x, Game Engines, News, Programming by admin

cocos2dx-logoCocos2d-x v3.13.1 is out!

This is a big release and highlights the following:

`Label` color was broken
applications will crash in debug mode if you don’t specify a design resolution
may crash if coming from background by clicking application icon on Android
`AudioEngine`: could not play audio if the audio lies outside APK. Also `AudioEngine::stop()` will trigger finish callback on Android.
applications would crash if using `SimpleAudioEngine` or the new `AudioEngine` if playing audio on Android 2.3.x
`object.setString()` has not effect if passing a number on JavaScript bindings

Read the full release notes.

Cocos Creator 1.2.2 released!

Cocos Creator is a complete environment for game development tools and workflow, including a game engine (based on Cocos2d-x), resource management, scene editing, animation, physics editor, game preview, debug and publish one project to multiple platforms.

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Configuring Primefaces application with glassfish and nginx

July 21, 2016 in Programming, Source Code, Tips & Tricks, Tutorial by admin

primefaces-logoOne of the issues I had these days was installing an Primefaces application in Glassfish application server  running in a container with no external IP address and configuring a nginx front-end for it. While making the two servers work together is just a matter of right configuration files, issues start to pile up when we want to have the context path removed from the nginx. Tried couple of approaches, using URL rewrite, proxy pass, etc, but in the end all of them ended up with links and resource files (ex. CSS files for the themes) not being found. Eventually after many tries ended up with this solution, which (so far) seems to work without any issue. Read the rest of this entry →

Survival Sample Game in C++ for Unreal Engine 4.12

June 10, 2016 in C++, Game Engines, Programming, Programming Languages, Unreal Engine by Adrian Marius

unreal-logo-smallSurvival Sample Game in C++ for Unreal Engine 4 is now updated for Version 4.12.

Code can be downloaded from github page.

Supercharging Android Apps With TensorFlow

May 28, 2016 in Android, Java by Adrian Marius

android-logoIn November 2015, Google announced and open sourced TensorFlow, its latest and greatest machine learning library. This is a big deal for three reasons:

  1. Machine Learning expertise: Google is a dominant force in machine learning. Its prominence in search owes a lot to the strides it achieved in machine learning.
  2. Scalability: the announcement noted that TensorFlow was initially designed for internal use and that it’s already in production for some live product features.
  3. Ability to run on Mobile.

This last reason is the operating reason for this post since we’ll be focusing on Android. If you examine the tensorflow repo on GitHub, you’ll find a little tensorflow/examples/android directory. I’ll try to shed some light on the Android TensorFlow example and some of the things going on under the hood.

android_tensorflow_classifier_results.jpg

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Step by step debugging firmware on the Aliexpress / EBay STM32 boards

May 9, 2016 in ARM, C, C++, Hardware, Linux, Microcontroller, Programming, STM32, Tips & Tricks, Tutorial by admin

arm_cortex_logoIn some previous topics (here and here) I wrote about some cheap development boards which can be acquired from EBay or Aliexpress. Since System Workbench for STM32 is freely available for a while now, let’s see how can we use it to generate a project, compile it, upload it to a board and debugging it step by step. We’ll use for this the board I got from EBay, but it works the same with the any STM32 other board I have and also with some self-made ones.

For being able to install firmware on the board and debug it, first we need to have a hardware part which will sit between the computer and the board. There are various models and versions of these jtag debugers and they can be ordered online or found pretty cheap on ebay (clones). Another way to get hold of one of these is to have a development board which comes equiped with JTAG adapters, like the STM32 discovery series of boards. Some of these JTAG debuggers allow even breaking apart the JTAG debugger from the development board itself (LPCXpresso series, the nucleo boards).
Regardless of which JTAG interface is used, it should be one which is known to work with OpenOCD, as we’ll use OpenOCD for debugging. In our case we’ll use the stm32f4 discovery board’s stlink2 side. However, Before using it as a JTAG debugger, we need to disconnect the STLink part from the discovery board, by removing two jumpers. Once that is done, the STLink itself won’t be connected to the discovery board and it’s SWD header can be connected to any other board. Read the rest of this entry →

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Five free plugins hit the Ureal Engine marketplace

May 7, 2016 in Game Engines, News, Programming, Unreal Engine by admin

unreal-logo-smallUnreal Engine marketplace started to release code plug-ins. For start, 5 free plug-ins will assist you in gathering analytics on player data, provide support for REST server communications, allow you to load MODO material .xml files for 3D meshes and more.

MODO material importer by The Foundry

The Unreal Material Importer is a plug-in for Unreal Engine 4 that you can use to load MODO material .xml files and apply them to 3D meshes of a game level in the Unreal Engine 4 editor.
If you have a MODO scene, you can export 3D meshes in the form of .fbx files, and materials and textures as .xml files.
You can then apply the exported materials to the .fbx 3D meshes in Unreal Engine, using the Unreal Material Importer plug-in.

Skookum Script by Agog Labs Inc.

SkookumScript’s cutting-edge command console turbocharges your workflow (at any stage of development) by enabling you to query and manipulate any UE4 game as it runs on any platform—without disrupting your existing tools, C++ code or BP graphs. So even if you aren’t looking for a scripting solution now, try our console. You’ll love it. We promise.

Then there’s SkookumScript itself—a text-based, compiled language that is made for games. With key game concepts such as concurrency built-in, SkookumScript empowers the entire team—from light coders to C++ veterans—to create sophisticated gameplay with surprisingly few lines of code. Its addictively useful IDE features live code changes with instant turnaround, context-sharing with the UE4 editor, and remote debugging. It painlessly scales with team size and content, and benevolently bridges between C++ and Blueprints—changes in SkookumScript are reflected live in Blueprint graphs and vice versa. Wow!

Lovingly crafted by veteran game developers, battle-tested on the hit AAA titles “Sleeping Dogs” and “Sleeping Dogs: Definitive Edition”, and now in use on several upcoming AAA and indie games, SkookumScript fills your game development experience with cackles of megalomaniacal glee. Better coding through mad science!

Gameanalitics by Gameanalitics

Understand your players’ in-game behaviour with the free GameAnalytics Plugin.

GameAnalytics collect player data and provides a powerful set of features that enables you to analyse in-game behaviour.

Start your analysis within 5 minutes, with our range of predefined dashboards (Real-time, Acquisition, Engagement, 1st monetizers, Monetization, Progression, Resources).

Track, visualize and evaluate:

• Player progression – Balance your levels and find out where your players struggle;
• In-game economy – Measure what your players are sinking their gold on and more;
• Custom dimensions – Track any relevant interaction with your game;
• Real money transactions with purchases validation – Analyze your validated revenue on all IAP purchases;
• Funnels – Improve your game, by digging into any sequence of events, by any segmentation;
• Error tracking – Investigate the quality of your game;
• and much more…

GameAnalytics makes it easy to assess your game mechanics, design and economy with the reports and tools it provides.

Logitech gaming SDKs by Logitech

This runtime plugin links to our .libs which find and load our SDK .dlls shipped with Logitech Gaming Software. LGS and the SDK .dlls are responsible for all the work done to communicate to each of the devices. We designed this loading scheme to allow for older versions of our .lib to have support for newer devices by upgrading LGS. This takes the burden off the game developer by shipping a smaller .lib and also ensures future support.

This plugin enables the control of Logitech Gaming products by porting these SDKs to the UE4 engine:

• Logitech|G ARX Control SDK
• Logitech|G LED Illumination SDK
• Logitech|G G-Key Macro SDK
• Logitech|G LCD Gamepanel SDK
• Logitech|G Steering Wheel SDK

Varest by Vladimir Alyamkin

VaRest is the plugin for Unreal Engine 4 that makes REST server communications easier to use.

List of Modules:
• VaRestPlugin (Runtime)
• VaRestEditorPlugin (Editor)

List of Features:
• Flexible Http/Https request management with support of different Verbs and Content Types
• No C++ coding required, everything can be managed via blueprints
• Blueprintable FJsonObject wrapper with almost full support of Json features: different types of values, arrays, binary data content, both ways serializarion to FString, etc.
• Blueprintable FJsonValue wrapper – full Json features made for blueprints!
• Both bindable events and latent functions are provided to control the asynchronous requests

Source: Unreal Engine blog.

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