The HackerBoards.com New Year’s 2017 guide to Linux friendly single board computers has now been published.

January 7, 2017 in Hardware, Linux, Raspberry PI by Adrian Marius

The HackerBoards.com New Year’s 2017 guide to Linux friendly single board computers has now been published. The project turned up 90 boards, ranging from powerful media playing rigs to power-sipping IoT platforms. A detailed analysis with summaries of each board is at http://hackerboards.com/ringing-in-2017-with-90-hacker-friendly-single-board-computers/, and a spreadsheet that compares the key specs of all 90 boards is at http://hackerboards.com/hacker-friendly-sbcs-table-170101.html

by admin

Step by step debugging firmware on the Aliexpress / EBay STM32 boards

May 9, 2016 in ARM, C, C++, Hardware, Linux, Microcontroller, Programming, STM32, Tips & Tricks, Tutorial by admin

arm_cortex_logoIn some previous topics (here and here) I wrote about some cheap development boards which can be acquired from EBay or Aliexpress. Since System Workbench for STM32 is freely available for a while now, let’s see how can we use it to generate a project, compile it, upload it to a board and debugging it step by step. We’ll use for this the board I got from EBay, but it works the same with the any STM32 other board I have and also with some self-made ones.

For being able to install firmware on the board and debug it, first we need to have a hardware part which will sit between the computer and the board. There are various models and versions of these jtag debugers and they can be ordered online or found pretty cheap on ebay (clones). Another way to get hold of one of these is to have a development board which comes equiped with JTAG adapters, like the STM32 discovery series of boards. Some of these JTAG debuggers allow even breaking apart the JTAG debugger from the development board itself (LPCXpresso series, the nucleo boards).
Regardless of which JTAG interface is used, it should be one which is known to work with OpenOCD, as we’ll use OpenOCD for debugging. In our case we’ll use the stm32f4 discovery board’s stlink2 side. However, Before using it as a JTAG debugger, we need to disconnect the STLink part from the discovery board, by removing two jumpers. Once that is done, the STLink itself won’t be connected to the discovery board and it’s SWD header can be connected to any other board. Read the rest of this entry →

by admin

STMicroelectronics Attracts Linux Users to Free Embedded Development on STM32 Microcontrollers

February 11, 2016 in ARM, Hardware, Linux, Microcontroller, News, Programming, STM32 by admin

armvia st.com press release:

STMicroelectronics, a global semiconductor leader serving customers across the spectrum of electronics applications, has extended opportunities to design free of charge with its popular STM32 microcontrollers for Linux system users including professional engineers, academics, and hobbyists.

Most Linux distributions are free, and open-source application software makes the Linux world attractive to technology enthusiasts. Until now, however, most development tools for embedded computing have been available only for Windows® PCs.

The STM32CubeMX configurator and initialization tool and the System Workbench® for STM32, an Integrated Development Environment (IDE) created by Ac6 Tools, supported by the openSTM32.org community, and available at www.st.com/sw4stm32, are now both available to run on Linux OS.

ST’s latest move means Linux users can now start their own embedded projects on STM32 devices, free of charge, without leaving their favorite desktop environment.

“The Linux community is known to attract creative free-thinkers who are adept at sharing ideas and solving challenges efficiently,” said Laurent Desseignes, Microcontroller Ecosystem Marketing Manager, Microcontroller Division, STMicroelectronics. “We are now making it ultra-easy for them to apply their skills to create imaginative new products, leveraging the features and performance of our STM32 family.”

ST’s commitment means users can now benefit from free software for configuring microcontrollers and developing and debugging code, together with manufacturer-supported low-cost evaluation boards, allowing greater focus on product development. Tools installation is very easy and fast, which contrasts with established practice in the Linux world, where users often have to create or adapt their own tools with minimal support.

“Since the launch of the System Workbench for STM32 in early 2015, its popularity has grown both on Windows and Linux platforms,” said Bernard Dautrevaux, Ac6 Tools Chief Technical Officer. “ST’s new tools for Linux both validate and complement our work and the openSTM32 initiative, and we plan to further support ST with major upgrades to System Workbench for STM32 in the future, including the support of OS/X as a development host.”

For the original article and more details, follow this link.

Unity3d 5.2 build for linux is out

November 20, 2015 in Linux, Unity by Adrian Marius

unreal-logo-smallBuild #2015101801 is released for Linux

Official Installer for 64-bit Ubuntu Linux:
http://files.unity3d.com/levi/unity-editor-5.2.2f1+20151018_amd64.deb

Unsupported Installer for Other 64-bit Distributions:
http://files.unity3d.com/levi/unity-editor-installer-5.2.2f1+20151018.sh

Release Notes

  • Update to Unity 5.2.2f1
  • Avoid crash when creating input context fails at startup
  • Make WebGL build output directory layout match the one generated on other platforms
  • Don’t leak file handles when communicating with external processes (e.g. audio importer)
  • Known issue: There’s a small regression in cursor offset handling in the game view
by admin

A new build of Unity for linux released

September 16, 2015 in Game Engines, Linux, Unity by admin

unityLogoA new build of Unity for linux was released. Via forum.unity3d.com:

Build #2015091501

Official Installer for 64-bit Ubuntu Linux:
http://download.unity3d.com/download_unity/unity-editor-5.1.0f3+2015091601_amd64.deb

Unsupported Installer for Other 64-bit Distributions:
http://download.unity3d.com/download_unity/unity-editor-installer-5.1.0f3+2015091501.sh

Release Notes

  • Make reported mouse offsets consistent everywhere
  • Fix direction of mouse scroll delta in play mode
  • Report mouse button events when cursor is locked in play mode
  • Support “Open in Unity” for Asset Store packages (opens new Unity instance for now)
  • Fix Asset Store for comma-decimal locales
  • Make popups less prone to inadvertently close
  • Fix shift+key in game view
  • Don’t crash on first run if XDG user directories aren’t configured
  • Fix interaction with Sprite Editor slice dropdown
  • Fix intermittent crashes when opening/closing child windows
  • Don’t double-report IMGUI key events in play mode
  • Fix initialization of fixed-size child windows (color picker)
by admin

Strategies for Implementing POSIX Condition Variables on Win32

January 12, 2015 in C, Linux, Programming, Source Code, Tips & Tricks, Windows by admin

c++In case one’s interested in cross-platform development, here is a nice article about various strategies of implementing POSIX condition variables on Win32. Quoting from the article:

The threading API provided by the Microsoft Win32 [Richter] family of operating systems (i.e., Windows NT, Windows ’95, and Windows CE) provides some of the same concurrency constructs defined by the POSIX Pthreads specification [Pthreads]. For instance, they both support mutexes, which serialize access to shared state. However, Win32 lacks full-fledged condition variables, which are a synchronization mechanism used by threads to wait until a condition expression involving shared data attains a particular state.

The lack of condition variables in Win32 makes it harder to implement certain concurrency abstractions, such as thread-safe message queues and thread pools. This article explores various techniques and patterns for implementing POSIX condition variables correctly and/or fairly on Win32. Section 2 explains what condition variables are and shows how to use them. Secion 3 explains alternative strategies for implementing POSIX condition variables using Win32 synchronization primitives. A subsequent article will describe how the Wrapper Facade pattern and various C++ language features can help reduce common mistakes that occur when programming condition variables.

For the entire article, follow this link.
Source: http://www.cs.wustl.edu/~schmidt/win32-cv-1.html

Reflections about ODROID-C1: Another Raspberry Pi Killer?

December 11, 2014 in Android, Linux, Raspberry PI by Adrian Marius

imagesNews via José Cerrejón Glez

I don’t comment usually anything regarding Raspberry PI direct competitors, but this has especially caught my attention due their price: $35. Want to know why I bought one?…

Its features are:

  • Amlogic ARMCortex-A5(ARMv7) 1.5Ghz quad core CPUs
  • Mali-450 MP2 GPU (OpenGL ES 2.0/1.1 for Linux and Android, no OpenCL)
  • VPU for hardware video decoder
  • Power Supply – 5V/2A DC input (2.5/0.8mm barrel). Typical power consumption: 0.5A @ 5V, up to 2A @ 5V with several USB peripherals.
  • 1Gbyte DDR3 SDRAM
  • Gigabit Ethernet
  • SPI, I2C, UART, ADC & GPIO with 40 pin
  • eMMC4.5 HS200 Flash Storage slot / UHS-1 SDR50 MicroSD Card slot
  • USB 2.0 Host x 4, USB OTG x 1
  • IR port
  • Ubuntu 14.04 & Android KitKat 4.4

 

Got 64-bit ARM Hardware?

November 26, 2014 in Linux, News by Adrian Marius

armARMv8 X-Gene X-C1 Development Systems, powered by Ubuntu 14.04 LTS, now available through Applied Micro’s developer enablement program.

Applied Micro are the first vendor to deliver a product-grade 64-bit ARMv8 SoC core in production form. The X-Gene Storm brings 8 cores at 2.4GHz driving dual DDR3 channels with on-chip integrated Gen3 SATA, 1GbE & 10GbE Ethernet uplinks.

https://insights.ubuntu.com/2014/11/25/got-64-bit-arm-hardware/

Read the rest of this entry →

by admin

CyanogenMod 10.1.1 Released – fixes for vulnerabilities that can bypass check for a digital signature

July 12, 2013 in Android, Linux, News, ROM by admin

cyanogen-modGiven all the Android security topics in the news, we thought it prudent to issue a follow-up to the 10.1.0 general release, incorporating patches for various vulnerabilities that have since been identified.

t the time of this post, CyanogenMod 10.1.1 releases are building and mirroring to our download portal. The CM 10.1.1 build is purely a security bug-fix release on top of the previous 10.1.0.x code-base. While it does not carry any new features, it does address the following:

  • Bug 8219321 aka “MasterKey” exploit (also patched in CM 7 and CM 9 source)
  • CVE-2013-2094 (Linux kernel exploit)
  • CVE-2013-2596 (Qualcomm-specific exploit)
  • CVE-2013-2597 (Qualcomm-specific exploit)
  • General device bug-fixes

With the security nature of this release, all users on CM 10.1.0.x are encouraged to update once their respective build is available

 

Source: here.

The Lazarus team is glad to announce the release of Lazarus 1.0.8.

March 21, 2013 in Linux, News, Qt by Adrian Marius

The Lazarus team is glad to announce the release of Lazarus 1.0.8.

This is a bug fix release, built with the current fpc 2.6.2. The
previous release 1.0.6 was built with 2.6.0.

Here is the list of changes for Lazarus and Free Pascal:
http://wiki.lazarus.freepascal.org/Lazarus_1.0_fixes_branch#Fixes_for_1.0.8
http://wiki.lazarus.freepascal.org/User_Changes_2.6.2

The release is available for download at SourceForge:
http://sourceforge.net/projects/lazarus/files/

Choose your CPU, OS, distro and then the “Lazarus 1.0.8” directory.

Minimum requirements:
Windows:       98, 2k, XP, Vista, 7, 32 or 64bit
FreeBSD/Linux: gtk 2.8 or qt4.5, 32 or 64bit
Mac OS X:      10.5, LCL only 32bit, non LCL apps can be 64bit

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