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BLE module consumes less than 4 mA in RX, less than 3 mA in TX, below 1.2 µA in sleep mode

April 26, 2016 in Hardware by admin

atmel-300x206Source: here

Atmel Corporation has announced the world’s lowest power Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) connectivity modules for small form factor applications. The ultra-low power Atmel SmartConnect XR and ZR modules consume less than 4mA in RX and less than 3mA in TX with 3.6V, and below 1.2µA in sleep mode, increasing battery life by up to 3X longer than other solutions on the market today.

Pushing the limits of space-constrained areas for tomorrow’s Bluetooth applications, the Atmel SmartConnect BTLC1000-XR and SAMB11-XR modules come in an extremely small 4.5×5.5mm LGA package with 40L, while the BTLC1000-ZR and SAMB11-ZR modules come in a 7.5×10.5mm package with 34-pins and a ground paddle. These new modules are ideal for space-constrained Internet of Things (IoT) applications including beacons, sensor tags door locks, wearables and much, much more.

For the entire article, follow this link.

 

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Using the LPC11xx I2C driver

February 17, 2016 in ARM, C, Code Snippets, Hardware, Microcontroller, Programming, Source Code, Tips & Tricks, Tutorial by admin

arm_cortex_logoShort article on using the I2C driver with LPC11xx for the people who don’t want over the way too complicated sample included with the library and just look for a quick way to get I2C up and running as soon as possible. For accessing the article, follow this link.

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STMicroelectronics Attracts Linux Users to Free Embedded Development on STM32 Microcontrollers

February 11, 2016 in ARM, Hardware, Linux, Microcontroller, News, Programming, STM32 by admin

armvia st.com press release:

STMicroelectronics, a global semiconductor leader serving customers across the spectrum of electronics applications, has extended opportunities to design free of charge with its popular STM32 microcontrollers for Linux system users including professional engineers, academics, and hobbyists.

Most Linux distributions are free, and open-source application software makes the Linux world attractive to technology enthusiasts. Until now, however, most development tools for embedded computing have been available only for Windows® PCs.

The STM32CubeMX configurator and initialization tool and the System Workbench® for STM32, an Integrated Development Environment (IDE) created by Ac6 Tools, supported by the openSTM32.org community, and available at www.st.com/sw4stm32, are now both available to run on Linux OS.

ST’s latest move means Linux users can now start their own embedded projects on STM32 devices, free of charge, without leaving their favorite desktop environment.

“The Linux community is known to attract creative free-thinkers who are adept at sharing ideas and solving challenges efficiently,” said Laurent Desseignes, Microcontroller Ecosystem Marketing Manager, Microcontroller Division, STMicroelectronics. “We are now making it ultra-easy for them to apply their skills to create imaginative new products, leveraging the features and performance of our STM32 family.”

ST’s commitment means users can now benefit from free software for configuring microcontrollers and developing and debugging code, together with manufacturer-supported low-cost evaluation boards, allowing greater focus on product development. Tools installation is very easy and fast, which contrasts with established practice in the Linux world, where users often have to create or adapt their own tools with minimal support.

“Since the launch of the System Workbench for STM32 in early 2015, its popularity has grown both on Windows and Linux platforms,” said Bernard Dautrevaux, Ac6 Tools Chief Technical Officer. “ST’s new tools for Linux both validate and complement our work and the openSTM32 initiative, and we plan to further support ST with major upgrades to System Workbench for STM32 in the future, including the support of OS/X as a development host.”

For the original article and more details, follow this link.

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World’s Largest Arduino Maker Challenge

December 15, 2015 in Hardware, Microcontroller by admin

via www.hackster.io:

Phase I: 1,000 Lucky Makers

The 1,000 makers who submit the best project ideas will win the newly releasedArduino MKR1000 (US only) and Genuino MKR1000 (Outside US) boards. If you win, you’ll be one of the first people on earth to get hold of these precious boards! The MKR1000 is a small SoC (System on Chip) that combines the functionality of the Arduino Zero and Arduino Wi-Fi Shield.

 

Phase II: 3 Big Winners

We will award the three winners who submit the best completed projects.

The prizes for these three finalists are the most exciting of all: a fully-funded (up to $1,500) trip to Maker Faire Shenzhen, New York, Bay Area or Rome; a chance to present your creation at the Microsoft and the Arduino & Genuino booths; a professional video production of you and your creation; and a whopping $500 gift certificate to Adafruit.

 

For more information follow this link.

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Atmel START software management platform

October 29, 2015 in ARM, Hardware, Microcontroller, Tips & Tricks by admin

arm_cortex_logoAtmel START is a web-based tool that helps developers easily integrate basic software building blocks and focus on their applications rather than configuration and integration of the basic software building blocks. With Atmel START software developers can:

  • graphically select software components
  • configure them for Atmel evaluation boards or custom boards.
  • build software platforms consisting of

low-level drivers,
advanced middleware,
Real Time Operating Systems (RTOS),
high-level communication stacks and more.

  • once configured, developers can download the configured software package into their own IDE and build their application.

Atmel START supports graphical configuring of pin-muxes, along with clock trees, and the configured software package can be downloaded for a variety of supported development environments. Atmel START is entirely web-based so no installation is required.

“Atmel START tool brings new possibilities for users of IAR Embedded Workbench,” said Mats Ullström, COO, IAR Systems. “Our advanced development tools complement the high-quality software that Atmel START delivers very well, and being able to rapidly configure example projects and deploy them on not only the hardware the user wants, but also for the tools the user is most comfortable with, is key to being able to get to market quickly.”

“The Atmel START platform makes it easy for developers to get projects off the ground quickly and obtain the most benefit from working with ARM Keil® MDK tools,” said Reinhard Keil, Director of Microcontroller Tools, ARM. “By using CMSIS, Atmel has once again proven the value of creating a platform built on a standards-based approach. Atmel START creates a robust and portable software management system that makes it easy for developers to deploy applications in any environment.”

Click this link to explore Atmel START platform.

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Running ‘hello world’ on Netis WF2419D router

September 19, 2015 in Code Snippets, DIY, Hardware, Microcontroller, Programming, RTL8196C, Tips & Tricks, Tutorial by admin

hardwareThis started as a quick fun project to do for breaking a bit apart from the usual daily stuff and mainly consist of building a ‘hello world’ application, install it on the modem’s flash and run it, instead of modem’s own firmware. The guinea pig will be a Netis WF2419D router I got cheaply some while ago, and just gathers the dust in the house.

If you wanna play with your modem, please note: You can render your modem unusable (this will, for sure, at least erase parts the existing data from the flash, leaving your modem unable to perform it’s modem duties). While probably there is a way of recovering from this (reinstalling the original firmware), if you manage overwrite the bootloader section of flash, it will become a paper weight (probably can be recovered by interfacing it with a JTAG or maybe removing the flash and copying data into it from another router’s flash). Anyway I take no responsability for your actions, broken modem, burned down house or whatever problem might happen because of this post.

Opening up the modem and getting out the circuit board, it’s packed with the following:

  • Realtek RTL 8196C SoC
  • RTL8192CE WLAN chip
  • Winbond W9812G6JH Ram (16 MB as 2M x 4Banks x 16 Bits SDRAM)
  • EON 4 MByte SPI flash

Read the rest of this entry →

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Raspberry Pi gets an official touchscreen display

September 8, 2015 in Hardware, News, Raspberry PI by admin

imagesvia engadget.com:

Although it’s pretty easy to hook up a Raspberry Pi to a screen using its HDMI port, it’s not exactly the most portable of solutions (especially if there isn’t a TV or monitor around). The Raspberry Pi Foundation recognized this, so it set about finding a “simple, embeddable display” capable of giving Pi owners a screen from which to work from, but that also embodies the DIY spirit of the board that it connects to. It’s taken almost a year, but the official Raspberry Pi touch display has gone on sale today, offering tinkerers a 7-inch capacitive 800 x 480 touchscreen display that supports 10-finger touch.

As you’d expect, connecting the display to the Pi requires a steady hand and a little patience — it’s not as easy as plugging in two ends of an HDMI cable (but that’s all part of the charm, right?). You can choose to power it via the Pi’s GPIO port or by plugging a microUSB power supply into the display board, while a ribbon cable connects to the Pi’s DSI port. The Raspberry Pi Foundation has ensured that both the display board and the Pi itself can be mounted on the back of the display (as shown in the image above), making it a lot easier to connect the various cables and also to store.

For the full article, follow this link.

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Mile High Milestone: Tegra K1 “Denver” Will Be First 64-bit ARM Processor for Android

August 12, 2014 in Android, Hardware, News by admin

From nvidia.com:

Our 32-bit Tegra K1 mobile processor has been racking up praise for bringing amazing performance and true console-quality graphics to the mobile space.

It “handily beats every other ARM SoC” in GPU performance benchmarks, according to Anandtech. And “the GPU performance is what stands out with the Tegra K1, nothing else on the market today is really able to get even close,” according to PC Perspective. Read the rest of this entry →

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STM32F429 Discovery board

December 23, 2013 in Hardware, Microcontroller, STM32 by admin

 

stm32f429

The new STM32F429 discovery board key features are impressive:

  • STM32F429ZIT6 microcontroller featuring 2 MB of Flash memory, 256 KB of RAM in an LQFP144 package
  • On-board ST-LINK/V2 with selection mode switch to use the kit as a standalone
  • ST-LINK/V2 (with SWD connector for programming and debugging)
  • Board power supply: through the USB bus or from an external 3 V or 5 V supply voltage
  • 2.4″ QVGA TFT LCD
  • SDRAM 64 Mbits
  • L3GD20, ST MEMS motion sensor, 3-axis digital output gyroscope
  • Six LEDs:
    • LD1 (red/green) for USB communication
    • LD2 (red) for 3.3 V power-on
    • Two user LEDs:LD3 (green), LD4 (red)
    • Two USB OTG LEDs:LD5 (green) VBUS and LD6 (red) OC (over-current)
  • Two pushbuttons (user and reset)
  • USB OTG with micro-AB connector
  • Extension header for LQFP144 I/Os for a quick connection to the prototyping board and an easy probing.

Like every Discovery board, it come with a huge amount of samples. It also has the Standard Peripheral Library available to start development with ease and it featuring  an embedded ST-Link/V2 . Read the rest of this entry →

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Cortex-M3 supervisor call (SVC) using GCC

December 12, 2013 in Code Snippets, Microcontroller, Source Code, Tips & Tricks, Tutorial by admin

cortex-m3Origina article here.

The Cortex-M3 has a new assembler instruction SVC to call the supervisor (usually the operating system). The ARM7TDMI used to call this interrupt SWI, but since this interrupt works differently on Cortex-M3, ARM renamed the instruction to make sure people recognize the difference and implement those calls correctly. The machine opcode however is still the same (bits 0-23 are user defined, bits 24-27 are ones).

On the Cortex-M3, other interrupts can interrupt the processor during state saving of the SVC interrupt (late arrival interrupt handling). Those late arriving interrupts most certainly leave the registers corrupted after execution. Therefor we cannot read the parameters form registers r0 to r4 directly as we could on the ARM7TDMI using SWI interrupts. Fortunately, the Cortex-M3 saves all registers used in standard C procedure call specification (ABI) on the stack. So the SVC handler can get the parameters directly from the stack. Read the rest of this entry →

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