Android things and Raspberry pi3

March 1, 2017 in Android, Devices, Hardware, Raspberry PI by Adrian Marius

For information on how to get started with Android Things and Rainbow HAT visit the official developer site for Android Things.

To put the latest Android Things image on your SD card, see the instructions here: https://developer.android.com/things/hardware/raspberrypi.html.

 

Rainbow HAT has a buffet of sensors, inputs and displays to explore Android ThingsTM. Use it as a weather station, a clock, a timer or stopwatch, a mood light, or endless other things.

We’ve worked with the Android Things team at Google to create this great add-on board that features displays, sensors, sound, and lots of LEDs! It’s the perfect introduction to developing Android Things applications on the Raspberry Pi.

Rainbow HAT also has a full Python API for use on Raspbian just like all of our other HATs that you know and love!

Rainbow HAT features:

  • Seven APA102 multicolour LEDs
  • Four 14-segment alphanumeric displays (green LEDs)
  • HT16K33 display driver chip
  • Three capacitive touch buttons
  • Atmel QT1070 capacitive touch driver chip
  • Blue, green and red LEDs
  • BMP280 temperature and pressure sensor
  • Piezo buzzer
  • Breakout pins for servo, I2C, SPI, and UART (all 3v3)

The board is designed specifically to show off the wide range of protocols available on the Raspberry Pi, including SPI (the APA102 LEDs), I2C (the BMP280 sensor and 14-segment displays), GPIO (the capacitive touch buttons and LEDs), and PWM (the piezo buzzer).

Raspberry Pi 3 Starter Kit for Android ThingsTM contains:

  • Raspberry Pi 3
  • Rainbow HAT
  • Pibow Coupé for Android Things
  • 2.5A official Raspberry Pi worldwide power supply
  • 8GB microSD card
by admin

Bitbanged USB stack on a sub-$1 Cortex M0+ MCU

January 5, 2017 in ARM, Devices, DIY, Hardware, Microcontroller, Tips & Tricks, Tutorial by admin

A nice presentation about how to get USB running on an sub-$1 Cortex M0+ ARM microcontroller that has no built in USB hardware. The talk describes the implementation of a new bitbanged USB stack, starting with a primer on the USB PHY layer and continuing up the stack, concluding with “Palawan”, a feature-complete open-source bitbanged USB Low Speed stack available for use on microcontrollers priced for under a dollar. We’ll go over requirements for getting USB to work, as well as talking about USB timing, packet order, and how to integrate everything together.

by admin

Using the TCS3771 family of devices with OpenLPC on lpc1114

May 1, 2016 in Devices, Hardware, I2C, LPC1114, Microcontroller by admin

 TCS3771 and alike are a range of I2C RGB sensors allowing one to read not only light intensity but also it’s color. With a bit of care and consideration, the light intensity can be calculated with quite a precision. They provides red, green, blue, and clear (RGBC) light sensing and proximity detection (when coupled with an external IR LED). They detect light intensity under a variety of lighting conditions and through a variety of attenuation materials.

The device contains a 4 × 4 photodiode array, integrating amplifiers, ADCs, accumulators, clocks, buffers, comparators, a state machine, and an I2C interface. The 4 × 4 photodiode array is composed of red-filtered, green-filtered, blue-filtered, and clear photodiodes – four of each type. Four integrating ADCs simultaneously convert the amplified photodiode currents to a digital value providing up to 16 bits of resolution. Upon completion of the conversion cycle, the conversion result is transferred to the data registers. The transfers are double-buffered to ensure that the integrity of the data is maintained. Communication to the device is accomplished through a fast (up to 400kHz), two-wire I2C serial bus for easy connection to a microcontroller or embedded controller.

This article hooks up a TCS3771 to LPC1114 and provides some explanation and code to read the RGB and C values from the device.

Skip to toolbar