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Atmel START software management platform

October 29, 2015 in ARM, Hardware, Microcontroller, Tips & Tricks by admin

arm_cortex_logoAtmel START is a web-based tool that helps developers easily integrate basic software building blocks and focus on their applications rather than configuration and integration of the basic software building blocks. With Atmel START software developers can:

  • graphically select software components
  • configure them for Atmel evaluation boards or custom boards.
  • build software platforms consisting of

low-level drivers,
advanced middleware,
Real Time Operating Systems (RTOS),
high-level communication stacks and more.

  • once configured, developers can download the configured software package into their own IDE and build their application.

Atmel START supports graphical configuring of pin-muxes, along with clock trees, and the configured software package can be downloaded for a variety of supported development environments. Atmel START is entirely web-based so no installation is required.

“Atmel START tool brings new possibilities for users of IAR Embedded Workbench,” said Mats Ullström, COO, IAR Systems. “Our advanced development tools complement the high-quality software that Atmel START delivers very well, and being able to rapidly configure example projects and deploy them on not only the hardware the user wants, but also for the tools the user is most comfortable with, is key to being able to get to market quickly.”

“The Atmel START platform makes it easy for developers to get projects off the ground quickly and obtain the most benefit from working with ARM Keil® MDK tools,” said Reinhard Keil, Director of Microcontroller Tools, ARM. “By using CMSIS, Atmel has once again proven the value of creating a platform built on a standards-based approach. Atmel START creates a robust and portable software management system that makes it easy for developers to deploy applications in any environment.”

Click this link to explore Atmel START platform.

Clojure all the way down: Finally a useful LISP

October 22, 2015 in Clojure, Lisp, Programming Languages by Adrian Marius

Slides and recording, in English, for the Clojure meetup they had yesterday.

http://bucharestfp.ro/2015/10/21/clojure-all-the-way-down-finally-a-useful-lisp/

Free versions of the Android SDK without a nasty EULA are now available

October 15, 2015 in Android by Adrian Marius

Free versions of the Android SDK without a nasty EULA are now available at

http://android-rebuilds.beuc.net/

(Rebuilding Android development tools from source, dropping non-free EULA and assessing reproducibility.)

Bjarne Stroustrup on the 30th anniversary of Cfront (the first C++ compiler)

October 14, 2015 in C++ by Adrian Marius

Bjarne Stroustrup on the 30th anniversary of Cfront (the first C++ compiler)

http://cpp-lang.io/30-years-of-cpp-bjarne-stroustrup/

 

The official Android-x86 git server is moved to sourceforge

October 13, 2015 in Android by Adrian Marius

The official Android-x86 git server is moved to sourceforge

http://sourceforge.net/p/android-x86/_list/git

Android-x86 5.1-rc1 (lollipop-x86) is released

October 12, 2015 in Android by Adrian Marius

The Android-x86 project is glad to announce 5.1-rc1 release to public. This is the first release candidate for Android-x86 5.1 (lollipop-x86) stable release. The prebuilt images are available in the following site:

The android marshmallow-x86 branch is ready for developers.

October 12, 2015 in Android by Adrian Marius

The marshmallow-x86 branch is ready for developers.

http://www.android-x86.org/getsourcecode

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CppCon 2015: Timur Doumler “C++ in the Audio Industry”

October 11, 2015 in C++, Programming, Programming Languages, Tips & Tricks by admin

c++Sound is an essential medium for human-computer interaction and vital for applications such as games and music production software. In the audio industry, C++ is the dominating programming language. This talk provides an insight into the patterns and tools that C++ developers in the audio industry rely on. There are interesting lessons to be learned from this domain that can be useful to every C++ developer.

Handling audio in real time presents interesting technical challenges. Techniques also used in other C++ domains have to be combined: real-time multithreading, lock-free programming, efficient DSP, SIMD, and low-latency hardware communication. C++ is the language of choice to tie all these requirements together. Clever leveraging of advanced C++ techniques, template metaprogramming, and the new C++11/14 standard makes these tasks more exciting than ever.

by admin

CppCon 2015: Fedor Pikus “Live Lock-Free or Deadlock (Practical Lock-free Programming)”

October 11, 2015 in C++, Programming, Programming Languages by admin

c++Part I: Introduction to lock-free programming. We will cover the fundamentals of lock-free vs lock-based programming, explore the reasons to write lock-free programs as well as the reasons not to. We will learn, or be reminded, of the basic tools of lock-free programming and consider few simple examples. To make sure you stay on for part II, we will try something beyond the simple examples, for example, a lock-free list, just to see how insanely complex the problems can get. Part II: having been burned on the complexities of generic lock-free algorithms in part I, we take a more practical approach: assuming we are not all writing STL, what limitations can we really live with? Turns out that there are some inherent limitations imposed by the nature of the concurrent problem: is here really such a thing as “concurrent queue” (yes, sort of) and we can take advantages of these limitations (what an idea, concurrency actually makes something easier!) Then there are practical limitations that most application programmers can accept: is there really such a thing as a “lock-free queue” (may be, and you don’t need it). We will explore practical examples of (mostly) lock-free data structures, with actual implementations and performance measurements. Even if the specific limitations and simplifying assumptions used in this talk do not apply to your problem, the main idea to take away is how to find such assumptions and take advantage of them, because, chances are, you can use lock-free techniques and write code that works for you and is much simpler than what you learned before.

by admin

CppCon 2015: Bjarne Stroustrup “Writing Good C++14”

October 11, 2015 in C++, Programming, Programming Languages, Tips & Tricks, Tutorial by admin

c++

How do we use C++14 to make our code better, rather than just different? How do we do so on a grand scale, rather than just for exceptional programmers? We need guidelines to help us progress from older styles, such as “C with Classes”, C, “pure OO”, etc. We need articulated rules to save us from each having to discover them for ourselves. Ideally, they should be machine-checkable, yet adjustable to serve specific needs.

In this talk, I describe a style of guidelines that can be deployed to help most C++ programmers. There could not be a single complete set of rules for everybody, but we are developing a set of rules for most C++ use. This core can be augmented with rules for specific application domains such as embedded systems and systems with stringent security requirements. The rules are prescriptive rather than merely sets of prohibitions, and about much more than code layout. I describe what the rules currently cover (e.g., interfaces, functions, resource management, and pointers). I describe tools and a few simple classes that can be used to support the guidelines.

 

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