Unreal Engine 4.15 Released

February 22, 2017 in Unreal Engine by Adrian Marius

Unreal Engine 4.15 Released

Unreal Engine 4.15 includes significant gains in overall stability, enhancements to developer workflows, and improvements to runtime performance resulting in greater efficiency during development and superior end user experiences after release.

Compile times for programmers are drastically reduced – by as much as 50%! Reloading content while Unreal Editor is running, Reroute nodes in Materials, a new Blendspace Editor, new mathematics Blueprint nodes, and more contribute to an even more streamlined development process in this release.

For those looking to squeeze out every drop of performance, Cooking Blueprints to C++ native code is no longer an experimental feature, the Texture Streaming system has gotten an overhaul, and Alternate Frame Rendering with NVIDIA SLI gives a boost on high end systems.

The Cinematics and Animation pipelines continue to strengthen with Animation blending now possible in Sequencer, linking Animation Curves to bones for culling in LODs, and modifying curves in Animation Blueprints with the Modify Curve node. Level Sequences can now be embedded in Actor Blueprints, and early support for Level Sequence Components is available for early adopters.

Developing for Nintendo Switch is available as experimental as part of the platform improvements. GPS data is now accessible on iOS and Android using the new Location Services. Also on iOS, streaming audio and remote notifications are fully supported. Monoscopic Far Field Rendering is an option for mobile VR platforms, HDR display output is available in an experimental state, and the ability to use Playstation VR Aim Controllers is also added.

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Unreal Engine 4.15 Preview 3 is ready to download

February 3, 2017 in Game Engines, News, Unreal Engine by admin

Via Uneal Engine forums:

We have just released Preview 3 for 4.15! Thank you for your continued help in testing the 4.15 build before its official release. As a reminder, the Preview builds are for testing only, and should not be used for the active development of your project.

For a list of known issues affecting this latest preview, please follow the links provided on the first post in this thread.

Cheers! Read the rest of this entry →

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Stingray Engine Code Walkthrough

January 27, 2017 in C, Game Engines, Stingray, Stingray, Tutorial by admin

 

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Qt Speech (Text to Speech) is here

January 25, 2017 in C++, News, Programming, Programming Languages, Qt by admin

via Qt blog:

“I’m happy that with Qt 5.8.0 we’ll have Qt Speech added as a new tech preview module. It took a while to get it in shape since the poor thing sometimes did not get the attention it deserved. We had trouble with some Android builds before that backend received proper care. Luckily there’s always the great Qt community to help out.

What’s in the package? Text to speech, that’s about it. The module is rather small, it abstracts away different platform backends to let you (or rather your apps) say smart things. In the screen shot you see that speech dispatcher on Linux does not care much about gender, that’s platform dependent and we do our best to give you access to the different voices and information about them.”

For more details, follow this link.

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Stingray Engine Code Walkthrough

January 25, 2017 in C, Game Engines, Programming, Stingray by admin

 

C++11 multithreading tutorial

January 23, 2017 in C++, Tutorial by Adrian Marius

The code for this tutorial is on GitHub: https://github.com/sol-prog/threads.

In  previous tutorials I’ve presented some of the newest C++11 additions to the language: regular expressions, raw strings and lambdas.

Perhaps one of the biggest change to the language is the addition of multithreading support. Before C++11, it was possible to target multicore computers using OS facilities (pthreads on Unix like systems) or libraries like OpenMP and MPI.

This tutorial is meant to get you started with C++11 threads and not to be an exhaustive reference of the standard.

 

 

The lost art of 3D rendering without shaders

January 22, 2017 in Programming Languages, Swift by Adrian Marius

Let’s say you wanted to create a sweet bouncing cube, like this:

A bouncing cube

You might use a 3D framework such as OpenGL or Metal. That involves writing one or more vertex shaders to transform your 3D objects, and one or more fragment shaders to draw these transformed objects on the screen.

The framework then takes these shaders and your 3D data, performs some magic, and paints everything in glorious 32-bit color.

But what exactly is that magic that OpenGL and Metal do behind the scenes?

http://machinethink.net/blog/3d-rendering-without-shaders/

Unreal Engine 4 Tutorial for Beginners

January 22, 2017 in Uncategorized by Adrian Marius

Unreal-begin-feature

Unreal Engine 4 is a collection of game development tools capable of producing everything from 2D mobile games to AAA console titles. It is the engine behind titles such as ARK: Survival Evolved, Tekken 7 and Kingdom Hearts III.

Developing in Unreal Engine 4 is very simple for beginners. Using the Blueprints Visual Scripting system, you can create entire games without writing a single line of code! Combined with an easy-to-use interface, you can quickly get a prototype up and running.

This Unreal Engine 4 tutorial is focused on helping beginners get started. Here are the key points that this tutorial will cover:

  • Installing the engine
  • Importing assets
  • Creating materials
  • Using Blueprints to create objects with basic functionality

To learn these, you will create a spinning turntable that displays a banana.

 

Unreal Engine 4 Tutorial for Beginners

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Stingray Engine Code Walkthrough

January 20, 2017 in C, Game Engines, Programming, Stingray, Stingray, Tutorial by admin

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Low-level plugins in Unity WebGL

January 20, 2017 in C++, Game Engines, OpenCL, Tips & Tricks, Tutorial, Unity by admin

Last year the guys at Unity launched on their blog a series of technical articles on WebGL. They are now back with a new article, showing how to reuse existing C / C++ such as graphic effect written in OpenGL ES code in a webpage, using Unity WebGL.

For the article, follow this link.

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